Tag: Mortgage Rates

Annual State Of The Residential Mortgage Market In Canada 2011 Brief Introduction

7th Annual State of the Residential Mortgage Market in Canada (ACCHA) November 2011 Prepared for Canadian Association of Accredited Mortgage Professionals (CAAMP) By Will Dunning CAAMP Chief EconomistThe Canadian Association of Accredited Mortgage Professionals released their “Annual State of the Residential Mortgage Market in Canada – November 2011”. According to the report the average mortgage growth is expected to be 7.3 per cent in 2012, beside, it is increasingly expected about mortgage interest rates that will remain low for a prolonged period, so Canadian consumer can get best mortgage rates in coming future. Here is the brief overlook of this report.

Introduction and Summary

This is the seventh annual report on the State of the Residential Mortgage Market in Canada. It has been prepared for the Canadian Association of Accredited Mortgage Professionals (“CAAMP”) by Will Dunning, Chief Economist of CAAMP. It provides an overview of the evolving state of the residential mortgage market in Canada. Major sections of this report are:

  • Introduction and Summary
  • Consumer Responses to Topical Questions
  • Consumer Choices and Satisfaction
  • Outlook for Residential Mortgage Lending

Data used in this report was obtained from various sources, including an online survey of 2,000 Canadians. More than one-half of the sample (1,031 Canadians) were home owners who have mortgages and/or other debt on their property. The remainder included renters, home owners without debts on their properties, or others who live with their families and are not responsible for mortgage payments or rents. The survey was conducted for CAAMP by Maritz (a national public opinion and market research firm) from October 20 to 25, 2011.

Consumer Responses to Topical Questions

In the Fall 2010 and 2011 editions of the CAAMP survey, consumers’ opinions were sought on several issues, related to housing and mortgages, that have taken on high profiles in the media. The consumers were asked to what extent they agree with various statements, on a 10-point scale: a response of 10 indicates that they agree completely with the statement and a response of 1 indicates they disagree completely. Average scores of 5.5 would indicate neutral opinions.

The table below summarizes the responses. Results are presented in substantially more detail in the body of the report (starting at Page 9).

For all of the questions, responses varied widely, and it is challenging to generalize about consumers’ attitudes. Highlights include:

  • The statement that found the highest degree of agreement (an average rating of 7.98 out of 10) is that “as a whole, Canadians have too much debt”. Almost one-half (46%) gave ratings of 9 or 10, showing very strong agreement with this statement. This, coincidentally or not, has been asserted repeatedly by senior government officials and other voices in the news media.
  • There is also agreement (average rating of 7.11 out of 10) that “low interest rates have meant that a lot of Canadians became homeowners over the past few years who should probably not be homeowners”.
  • However, different perspectives were found with several other questions.
  • There is a widespread opinion that “real estate in Canada is a good long-term investment”, which received the second highest rating, an average of 7.27 out of 10.
  • Furthermore, there was a high degree of agreement that mortgage debt is “good debt (7.07 out of 10).
  • In addition, in a statement that was asked for mortgage holders only, few agreed that “I regret taking on the size of mortgage I did”. The average score of 4.04 was well below neutral. Just 7% agreed strongly with the statement; 37% strongly disagreed.
  • Many Canadians believe that other people have taken on too much debt or have bought homes for which they are unprepared. But, when responses about their own situations are aggregated, most believe that they have been responsible. The contrast between these sets of responses is interesting. Actual behavior by people and their beliefs about their own behavior tells us more than does their beliefs about the behavior of other people: overall these responses suggest that prudence rules the land.
  • Meanwhile, data on mortgage arrears indicates that there are very few Canadians who are not meeting their mortgage obligations, and estimates developed in this report indicate that a vast majority of Canadian mortgage borrowers are well positioned to deal with potential increases of mortgage rates. Moreover, they are acting aggressively to pay off their mortgages, considerably more rapidly than they are required to.

Consumer Responses to Topical Questions
Average Responses (10 = Completely Agree)

Topic Fall 2011
Canada’s housing market is in a “bubble” 6.07
I am concerned about a downturn in Canada’s housing market in the next year 5.84
Canada’s superior banking system will shelter us from significant downturns like the one experienced by the United States 6.11
As a whole, Canadians have too much debt 7.98
House prices in my community are at a reasonable level 5.62
Low interest rates have meant that a lot of Canadians became home owners over the past few years who should probably not be home owners 7.01
I/My family would be well-positioned to weather a potential downturn in home prices 6.72
Real estate in Canada is a good long-term investment 7.27
I am optimistic about the economy in the coming 12 months 6.02
I regret taking on the size of mortgage I did 4.04
I am delaying my retirement until my mortgage is paid off 5.38
I would classify mortgages as “good debt” 7.07

Source: Maritz survey for CAAMP, Fall 2011.

Consumer Choices and Satisfaction

The survey found that Canadians remain highly satisfied with the terms of their mortgages, and their experiences in obtaining their mortgages:

  • 13% indicate they are completely satisfied with the terms of their mortgages (giving a rating of 10 out of 10) and a further 58% are satisfied (ratings of 7 to 9 out of 10). Combining these results, 71% are satisfied to some degree.
  • 21% give a neutral satisfaction rate (5 or 6 out of 10).
  • Just 8% are dissatisfied to some degree (1 to 4 out of 10).
  • On average, the satisfaction rate is 7.4 out of 10.

Satisfaction with mortgage experiences was very similar, and the average rating was fractionally higher, at 7.6 out of 10. Older age groups are more satisfied with their mortgages and their mortgage experiences than are younger age groups. There are some variations across different groups.

About one-third (32%) of home owners with mortgages had some form of mortgaging activity during the past 12 months: taking out a new mortgage (9%), or renewing or refinancing an existing mortgage (23%). The remainder (68%) did not have any mortgaging activity during the year.

Among those who renewed or refinanced an existing mortgage during the past 12 months, 21% changed lenders and 79% remained with the same lender. The rate of switching has edged upwards – two years ago it was 12%.

Concerning types of mortgages, fixed rate mortgages remain most popular (60%). A significant minority (31%) are variable and adjustable rate mortgages. For mortgages originated or renewed during the past year, an increased share (37%) has variable or adjustable rates. This shift may be due to the large spread between rates for fixed rate and variable rate mortgages (close to 2% during the past year). As well, it is increasingly expected that mortgage interest rates will remain low for a prolonged period. Both of these factors are encouraging borrowers to accept the risk that the payments will increase for variable rate mortgages.

With regard to mortgage amortization periods, 22% of mortgages in Canada have amortization periods of more than 25 years. The share is higher (38%) among home owners who, during 2011, took out a new mortgage on a newly-purchased home or condominium.

Looking at interest rates, the CAAMP/Maritz data indicates that:

  • The average mortgage interest rate for home owners’ mortgages is 3.92%, a drop from 4.22% a year earlier.
  • For borrowers who have renewed or refinanced a mortgage during the past year, their current average interest rate is lower (by 1.24 percentage points) than the rates prior to renewal. Among borrowers who renewed, a large majority (78%) saw reductions, a smaller proportion (13%) saw their rates rise, and 9% had no change. Based on the survey data, it is estimated that among 1.35 million mortgage borrowers who renewed or refinanced in the past year, the combined saving was $2.7 billion per year.

Mortgage rate discounting remains widespread in Canada. During the past year, the average “posted” rate for 5-year fixed rate mortgages was 5.38%. Discounted rates are estimated at an average of 3.92%, implying an average discount of 1.46 points.

Given concerns that have been expressed about consumers’ abilities to cope with potential rises in interest rates, this issue of CAAMP’s “Annual State of the Residential Mortgage Market” asked mortgage holders to indicate “the amount at which, if your monthly mortgage payment increased this much, you would be concerned with your ability to make your payments”. The average amount of room is $750 per month on top of their current costs. A vast majority of mortgage holders has considerable capacity to afford rises in mortgage interest rates. There is a sizable minority (12%, or about 650,000 out of 5.80 million) who would be challenged by rate rises of less than 1%. However, most of these have fixed rate mortgages: by the time their mortgages are due for renewal, their financial capacity will have increased and the amount of mortgage debt will be reduced. Moreover, most of these borrowers (88%) have 10% (or more equity) in their homes. There are about 75,000 borrowers who are susceptible to short term moves of interest rates and have limited home equity – less than 2% of the 5.8 million mortgage holders in Canada.

This study asked questions that generated estimates of home owners’ equity.

  • The total value of owner-occupied housing in Canada is estimated at $3.017 trillion. Mortgages and lines of credit on these homes total $982 billion, leaving $2.035 trillion in home owners’ equity. The equity is equal to 68% of the total value of the housing.
  • Among home owners who have mortgages and/or lines of credit on their homes, 2% might have negative equity, and a further 4% have estimated equity of less than 10%. More than three-quarters (78%) have 25% or more equity.

The survey data indicates that 10% of mortgage borrowers took equity out of their home in the past year. The average amount is estimated at $49,000. These results imply that the total amount of equity take-out during the past year has been $28.5 billion. The most common use for the funds from equity take-out is debt consolidation and repayment, which accounted for $11 billion. This part of the total equity take-out would result in corresponding reductions for other forms of consumer debt. Home renovations accounted for about $5 billion of the equity take-out, with $6 billion for education and other spending, $3.5 billion for investments, and $3 billion for “other” purposes.

Among borrowers who have taken out a new mortgage during the past year, 52% obtained the mortgage from a bank, 32% from a mortgage broker, and 16% from other sources.

Outlook for Residential Mortgage Lending

Gradual recovery from the recession of 2008/09 has brought stabilization of housing activity, but at lower levels than pre-recession. The consensus of forecasts is for a continued moderate rate of job creation, which is expected to result in housing activity similar to recent levels, for both resales and new homes. These levels of activity are strong enough to support stable or slowly rising housing values: the average of forecasts is for house price growth of about 1% in 2012, a slowdown from the very strong growth of 7.7% expected for 2011.

As of this August, there is $1.079 trillion of residential mortgage credit outstanding in Canada. This includes both owner-occupied and investor-owned residential properties.

Based on the housing market forecasts, the volume of residential mortgage credit outstanding is forecast to continue expanding. Growth is forecast at about 7.7% during 2011 ($80 billion) and 7.3% in 2012 ($81 billion). A preliminary look at 2013 suggests growth of 7.0% ($83 billion).

While the forecasts for the economy, housing market, and mortgage market are encouraging, there is, as always, uncertainty about the outlook. In Canada, the largest risk factor for the mortgage market is “loss of ability to pay” (that is, job loss or a reduction of wages).

Data published by the Canadian Bankers Association shows that the gradual recovery from the recession is resulting in a gradually falling rate of mortgage arrears.

An increasing level of uncertainty about economic prospects is creating uncertainty about the outlook for the housing and mortgage markets.

The risk factor that gets the greatest amount of attention in Canada might be characterized as “an unaffordable rise in mortgage costs”. CAAMP’s research has repeatedly found that this is a negligible risk factor for Canada at present.

Thus, there are risks of outcomes worse than these forecasts. If that occurs, the cause will have been events in the broader economy. The US’s enormous economic difficulties started in the housing and mortgage markets. That will not be the case in Canada.

Looking for the full report, click here to download it from its official location (Canadian Association of Accredited Mortgage Professionals), its 34 pages PDF ebook that requires an Adobe Acrobat Reader to open the report. Source: Annual State of the Residential Mortgage Market in Canada, Nov 2011, CAAMP.

Disclaimer! This report has been compiled using data and sources that are believed to be reliable. CAAMP, Maritz, Will Dunning, and Will Dunning Inc. accept no responsibility for any data or conclusions contained herein. The opinions and conclusions in this report are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of CAAMP or Maritz.

Compare and Find Best Mortgage Rates in Canada!


How and Where To Get The Best Mortgage Rates Canada

People mostly looking to get answers for two most important questions when looking for a mortgage loan in Canada! How to get the best mortgage interest rate? and Where to get the best mortgage rates Canada? Finding for the best mortgage rates Canada is a tough job for new and even an experienced prospective homeowner. Most of the people believe that they are getting the best rate, however, often times they are ending up by paying higher interest opposite to their need for a lower rates. The mortgage market overwhelms most of the first time home buyers by forcing them to accept more costly and expensive mortgage rates rather than the lower rates known as the best mortgage rates Canada. This has made incredibly unfortunate for most of the Canadians to pay thousands of dollars over the value what they should be paying on their mortgages but there are various mortgage lending companies who don’t want mortgage shoppers to be taken advantage other than to provide the best mortgage rates Canada.

These best mortgage companies provides visitors with the resources necessary to make well informed educated decisions when comparing the best mortgage rates in Canada through a network of top Canadian mortgage lenders and mortgage brokers. This includes an efficient current rates mortgage calculator, which may compiles over hundreds of the best mortgage rates Canada from the top mortgage loan providing banks, credit unions and brokers working throughout Canada. This kind of quick and easy way to work out your monthly mortgage payments based on your budget, mortgage rate comparison plate form is an absolute requirement for any new and confused buyer looking for the best mortgage rates Canada that suit their specific individual needs. Moreover, they also offer guidelines through a concise Mortgage Guide that explains the basics of a mortgage, mortgage rates, types and comprehensive statistics to help all first time home buyers to search, compare and navigate the mortgage market and make brilliant and well thoughtful decisions. Such kind of mortgage advisory and facilitation is an invaluable tool for anyone looking to find and compare themselves of the best mortgage rates Canada not even for their residential but commercial mortgage rates Canada to lower their mortgage cost and payment periods.

It has been observed that most of the people undertake mortgages very lightly although there is a great need of a thorough research and to understand the mortgage process, rates, repayment options and types of mortgages. This reduces their ability to find best mortgage rates Canada, resulting in an expensive deal on their dream home. Due to today’s tight economic situation, no one wants and even affords to loose their hard earned savings to pay off their home when they could be paying for their other most important expenses like households, education for their children or planning a vacation for their family.

Its today’s reality that can be easily heard without any surprise if any person says about his or her financial condition as tight with money, home owners specially without any additional income may find it hard to pay off large amounts of their mortgage payments each month. That’s why, those first time home owner’s who don’t afford to pay these supplementary payments may face significantly higher amounts of interest on top of there already high purchase price due to the housing boom of the past few years. So it has become an integral duty towards your financial health to find a best mortgage rates Canada that can save you as a home owners in thousands of dollars in the long run, and making your investment worthwhile, every new home owners should educate themselves while researching a finding for the best mortgage rates Canada.

It has seen a considerable increase of people searching online for their mortgage and most searches have been taken place for the province of Ontario and our great city Toronto especially when searching for the best mortgage rates using a phrase like “best mortgage rates Toronto” and “best mortgage rates Ontario” are common among those borrowers looking for lowest mortgage rates in Canada. According to mortgage surveys internet usage for such consumers that were only 26% in 1999 have been increased to more than 40% today although personal relation with mortgage companies and people also considered a great way to find a best mortgage rates Canada.

Rate Supermarket Canada is becoming a great online mortgage service and resource center for busy people and who have been frustrated with navigating the real estate market, looking for an easier, intelligent and informed decision about their current or future homes. You may definitely get answer of your question, “how and where to get the best mortgage rates Canada?” Looking for a mortgage broker or a lender is no more difficult for people searching for the most affordable and qualified companies in all the provinces and territories throughout Canada. You will get high-class information and first class mortgage brokers, consultants and top banks to let you able to directly contact with your favorite lenders to facilitate your largest investment with success and reach your financial goals in finding a best mortgage rates Canada.

Best Mortgage Rates in Canada!
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Canadian Banks Increase Prime Rates After Bank of Canada’s Rate Hike of July 20

The big 5 Canadian banks have been showing considerable rise in their prime lending rates today after the Bank of Canada’s rate hike earlier in this week. Banks like RBC, TD, BMO, CIBC and Scotiabank have increased their Prime lending rates by 0.25% to 2.75%, effective July 21. It also increased variable mortgage rates, including those offered by brokers as well, for the best mortgage rate that were closed at 1.75% for a 5 year variable previously was now expected to increase up to 2.00% now.

The Bank of Canada hiked its key interest rate by a quarter point earlier this week! For the second month in a row.

In its statement the Bank noted that it “expects the economic recovery in Canada to be more gradual than it had projected in last April, with growth of 3.5% in 2010, 2.9% in 2011, and 2.2% in 2012. This revision reflects a slightly weaker profile for global economic growth and more modest consumption growth in Canada.”

Most lending institutions including Canadian big banks are expected to respond to the Bank’s rate hike by increasing their prime lending rates by a minimum quarter point. However, lenders do vary in when exactly they adjust their rates for variable-rate mortgages. Contact your bank or a mortgage professional for more information on how a particular lender may implement a rate increase. As its a time when mortgage holders or potential borrowers should sit down with their mortgage professional to explore their options and decide what makes the most sense for their own financial situation.

A competitive five-year fixed mortgage rate is available to qualified borrowers at 4.29%, while with the Bank’s rate increased, a competitive variable rate mortgage is available to qualified borrowers at 2.15%, prime of 2.75 per cent minus 0.60 per cent.

Prime & variable mortgage rates update with Canada’s lenders / brokers / bankers as of July 21, 2010:

  • Dominion Lending – Prime rate: 2.75%; Change (%): +0.25%; Variable mortgage rate: 2.00%; Change (%): +0.25%
  • ScotiaBank – Prime rate: 2.75%; Change (%): +0.25%; Variable mortgage rate: 2.60%; Change (%): +0.25%
  • CIBC – Prime rate: 2.75%; Change (%): +0.25%; Variable mortgage rate: 2.60%; Change (%): +0.25%
  • RBC – Prime rate: 2.75%; Change (%): +0.25%; Variable mortgage rate: 2.60%; Change (%): +0.25%
  • Canada Trust – Prime rate: 2.75%; Change (%): +0.25%; Variable mortgage rate: 2.35%*; Change (%): +0%*

As far as the Fixed-rate mortgages are concerned, it will not get any changes directly by the Bank of Canada rate hike announcement as their rates are influenced more by movements in the bond market, tend to climb when traders shift investment activity to riskier equity assets from bonds that are considered safer.

Compare the Canadian best mortgage rates from banks and brokers!


Tips For Boosting Affordability! How Much Mortgage Can I Afford?

Getting lower mortgage rates mean great saving but increased affordability is what attracts more homebuyers. Anyhow, there are few more ways available to first-time homebuyers that offer affordable housing along with financial tactics that increases our savings to the point where we feel comfortable. Here are some time-tested strategies to consider in the light of our updated present economical situation to further increase mortgage affordability:

Pre-Qualification! Know What You Can Afford

The first thing I recommend to all homebuyers to find a mortgage broker and get pre-qualified or pre-approved for a mortgage. A mortgage pre-approval helps you establish a price range and the maximum mortgage you can reasonably afford. There are many lenders who offer pre-approving facility to their potential borrowers for a mortgage to lock-in a rate for up to 120 days.

Fixed-Rate Mortgages! Fix The Rate For A Longer Term You Afford

Consider locking in your rate for a longer period of time! If you’re uneasy about fluctuating interest rates and your ability to meet any increases, then a fixed-rate mortgage could be an ideal fit. Many lenders are open to longer fixed terms that may be up to 10 years in some cases.

Down Payment! Pay Maximum You Can Afford

Increased affordability comes from increasing the size of your down payment that results a lower monthly payment. A common way for first time buyers to come up with more cash for a down payment is to make use of the federal Home Buyers’ Plan. With this Plan, you can now withdraw more than before which is up to $25,000 each from a RRSP (registered retirement savings plan) without tax penalty to buy or build a qualifying home. Also, many lenders allow the down payment to come from a properly documented gift, and a borrowed down payment may be possible for some borrowers.

Debt Restructuring! Revisiting Your Current Debts

Your total debt service ratio (TDS) is what your lender will look at while considering your mortgage application to see how much of your total income is going towards various types of consumer loans, including your personal loans, credit cards, charge cards, child support, car loans and other. To increase your affordability and success that your TDS ratio is acceptable to prospective lenders, your mortgage broker can advise on restructuring your current debt (by increasing the amortization and lowering payments on your consumer loans like car loan, etc.,).

You could get more valuable advice and practical tips to boost affordability specific to your own situation by your mortgage professional. However, first-time homebuyers need to be very careful when finding a mortgage that is several times their income. If you lose your job or get into financial difficulty, you could easily miss mortgage payments and lose your home. It is vital you are borrowing no more than you can afford to spend each month. Although present real estate market and its soft home prices along with the low interest rates have been making affordable house plans to further enhance mortgage loan market about which economists believe interest rates will stay at its lowest position for the next two years or so but you should not treat this as a guarantee.


Canadian Mortgage Strategy Choosing Between Fixed or Variable Mortgage Rates

The debate between fixed-rate mortgages and variable-rate mortgages will seem to be forever because these both strategies hold strong financial footing and efficiency that both provide advantages on what thousands of mortgage consultants, lenders and planners have been assisting their clients on their decision-making. Where as the variable rates strategy seems to be getting priority in Canada and have been adopted while taking as the best mortgage strategy that can save lot of money:

According to the latest research study by one of the Canadian economic experts, Moshe Milevsky, associate professor of finance at York University, reaffirm his year 2001 conclusion that, “Canadian homeowners really do pay extra for fixed-rate mortgages over the long run”, further he shows that “variable rate mortgages hold more benefits to majority of consumers with most of the time”. He extracted his finding while taking mortgage rate data from year 1950 to 2007 and found that choosing a variable rate mortgage would have saved Canadian mortgage consumers  $20,000 in interest payments over 15 years, based on a $100,000 mortgage value. Moreover, he also found that it would have been better off with a variable rate mortgage compared to a five-year fixed rate 89 % of the time.

New mortgage application has an incredible number of options from which to choose. However, with shifting interest rates, it can be a confusing time for those looking to acquire, renew or refinance a mortgage. Getting the most advantageous mortgage strategy is important and this challenging task cant be solve with anybody else accept you. This is the question you should ask yourself: Do I want the stability of a fixed rate mortgage or am I comfortable with the potential risks and rewards of a variable rate mortgage?

A variable mortgage rates allow the borrower to take advantage of low interest rates where the interest rate is calculated on an ongoing basis at prime minus a set percentage where prime is the base rate that banks use in pricing loans to their most creditworthy customers.  A variable rate mortgage can pose challenges for some, such as financially stretched first-time buyers who may not be able to handle an increase in their mortgage payments that would usually accompany a significant rise in interest rates, and there are those who simply prefer the greater sense of stability that a five to ten year fixed term mortgage can provide.

Faced with today’s competitive mortgage market and a changing interest rate environment, credit consumers need access to the timely and quality information through a recognized and trustworthy source. Which can help them decide while looking carefully at their current situation and personal goals to determine which mortgage strategy will best meet their individual needs. Moreover, you should try to get an answer yourself after consulting your mortgage broker whether a fixed or variable mortgage is best for you.


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